RxGenesys is a cosmeceutical product formulated by Jeffrey Gibson M.D. that claims to use advanced stem cell technology to turn back the hands of time, making your skin look radiant and beautiful in just a few weeks. RxGenesys insists their groundbreaking formula will help your skin look noticeably firmer and visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles.

What’s the story behind RxGenesys stem cell cosmetics for my skin?

RxGenesys is heralded as a cutting-edge technology, claiming to be the first to use its Rx Stem CellTechnology in its cosmetics. This breakthrough, they claim, involves creating a purified extract of “youth messengers” such as proteins and lipids from induced human pluripotent stem cells (not embryonic stem cells).

Using a patented process, they claim this extract is then put in a polysaccharide formula along with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. This polysaccharide formula is said to deeply penetrate and revitalize the skin.

RxGenesys touts it was created by Dr. Jeffrey Gibson, M.D., a Miami plastic surgeon. Along with his wife Kristy Barany, they created RxGenesys and partnered with Shark Tank vet Kevin Harrington who is in charge of their Direct Response (aka “As Seen On TV”) campaign. They raised 4 million in funding and have hired supermodel Paulina Porizkova as their spokesperson.

What exactly is an induced pluripotent stem cell?

An induced pluripotent stem cell or IPS is a type of stem cell that can be used to generate new adult stem cells of any organ in the human body. There is some controversy about IPS derived from human embryos, as it destroys the cell in the process. However, breakthroughs in 2006 and 2012 allowed scientists to derive IPS from other cells and achieve similar results.

The potential for stem cell use in medicine is quite exciting, as scientists are finding they may help with problems such as diabetes, heart disease, and more. However, stem cell research is still in its infancy, and currently offers more hype than proven results. In fact, according to WebMD there are no approved stem cell therapies in the US.

In the murky world of cosmeceuticals, aka cosmetics that pose as pharmaceutical therapies, they don’t need to prove these types of alleged “stem cell cosmetics” work. The way RxGenesys gets around this is by including statements at the bottom of the page that they have not been evaluated by the FDA and “are not intended to be drug products that diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or condition.”

How does RxGenesys say it works to make me look younger?

RxGensys is essentially 4 different products combined into one (expensive) package.

RxCleanser:

Said to also include green tea, they tell you to apply to cleanse the skin as well as prime it to absorb your RxGenesys Beauty System.

Ingredients: Deionized Water, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Glycerin, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Extract, Glycerin (and) Water (and) Dextran (and) Caprooyl-Tetrapeptide-3, Water (and) Glycerin (and) Polygonum Aviculare Extract, Hyaluronic Acid, Camellia sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B5), Hydroxyethylcellulose, Citric Acid, Polysorbate 20, Phenoxyethanol (and) Ethylhexylglycerin, Fragrance.

RxMoisturizer:

They tout the moisturizer will infuse your skin with the powerful RxGen Complex and its nourishing ingredients will revitalize your skin.

Ingredients: Deionized Water, Candelilla/Jojoba/Rice Bran Polyglyceryl-3 Esters (and) Glyceryl Stearate ( and) Cetearyl Alcohol (and) Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, Capric/Caprylic Triglycerides, Glycerin, Cetearyl Alcohol,  Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Extract, Dimethicone, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin (and) Water (and) Dextran (and) Caprooyl-Tetrapeptide-3, Water (and) Glycerin (and) Polygonum Aviculare Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate (Vitamin C Ester), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E Acetate), Hyaluronic Acid, Camellia sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B5), Hydroxyethylcellulose, Xanthan Gum, Phenoxyethanol (and) Caprylyl Glycol (and) Ethylhexylglycerin (and) Hexylene Glycol, Fragrance.

RxIlluminator:

They state this is a pore minimizing serum that will improve your skin’s overall tone and texture.

Ingredients: Deionized Water, Cyclopentasiloxane Dimethicone (and) Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Palmaria palmata Extract, Butylene Glycol, Lauryl PEG-8 Dimethicone, Glycerin (and) Water (and) Dextran (and) Caprooyl-Tetrapeptide-3, Water (and) Glycerin (and) Polygonum Aviculare Extract, Polyamide-5, Induced Pluripotent Cell Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Camellia sinensis, (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B5), Phytic Acid, Sodium Chloride (Sea Salt), Phenoxyethanol (and) Caprylyl Glycol (and) Ethylhexylglycerin (and) Hexylene Glycol, Fragrance.

RxVital:

They tout this is their most powerful wrinkle-fighting serum that works overnight and contains the highest concentration of their RxGen Complex to promote beautiful, younger looking skin.

Ingredients: Deionized Water, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Extract, Glycerin, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin (and) Water (and) Dextran (and) Caprooyl-Tetrapeptide-3, Water (and) Glycerin (and) Polygonum Aviculare Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate (Vitamin C Ester), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E Acetate), Hyaluronic Acid, Camellia sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B5), Hydroxyethylcellulose, Lactic Acid, Polysorbate 20, Phenoxyethanol (and) Caprylyl Glycol (and) Ethylhexylglycerin (and) Hexylene Glycol, Fragrance.

You are instructed to use the RxCleanser and RxMoisturizer both in the morning and in the evening; they say to use the RxIlluminator in the day and the RxVital at night.

What does it cost to try RxGenesys stem cell complex system?

To get you to try RxGenesys, they’ll send you a 90-day supply the RxGenesys Complete Beauty System (as described above) for $39.95 PER MONTH for 3 months. As “Paulina’s free gift” they’ll throw in a travel size (15 ml) of each bottle, that comes in its own pouch and they’ll waive the shipping charges.

Total for the first 3-month shipment: $119.85

Then, if you don’t call to cancel, approximately 12 weeks after your first shipment, they’ll ship you another set of RxGenesys Complete Beauty System and bill you $39.95 for 3 months, plus one charge of $9.99 for the shipment.

Total for every other 3-month shipment: $129.84

Or, if you take their upsell for the RxGenesys Premium Beauty System (which includes an extra bottle of RxVital) you pay $49.94 for 3-months plus the shipping fee for a total of $159.81.

RxGenesys 60-day guarantee

RxGenesys promises a 60-day money back guarantee. They state if you are not satisfied and you contact them within the first 60 days after any order is shipped they will give you return instructions and receive a full refund, whether or not the bottles have been opened or used.

RxGenesys Customer Service: (855) 792-3288.

Bottom Line: RxGenesys is an unproven cosmetic line that contains NO stem cells

That’s right – in spite of hyping “induced pluripotent stem cell technology” and using the words “stem cell skin care” in the name, RxGenesys doesn’t even have ANY stem cells.

Buried in their FAQ, they state that adult human fibroblast cells serve as the “starting point” for obtaining their key ingredient in RxGen. How this process actually works (and what this really means) is left vague.

Still, even if they were somehow able to inject human stem cells into this cosmetic, they would quickly die, because in order for stem cells to live, they have to have a steady supply of nutrients and be kept at a specific temperature. “At best you have a cream filled with dead stem cells that have no potential to do anything,” stated a post about  stem cell creams on the Beauty Brains Blog, a site run by cosmetics chemists. 

Next, the evidence presented in their clinical study is incomplete, many of the results are user-reported, and the company behind it appears to be biased. They only include a link to 5 pages of the 65-page report and the most dramatic results come from self-assessment, not from any actual measurement.

We’d also like to mention that Princeton Research (no relation to the distinguished Princeton University) is running a video ad on their home page for RxGenesys, where Dr. Tony Barlow says he is “excited” about testing it and based on its “stem cell element” should give a good response.

Finally, Paulina Porizkova is indeed a very beautiful woman, who likely has “good genes” (as well as perfect lighting, a makeup stylist, etc.). She may endorse RxGenesys for a fee but, since it is so new, it’s clearly not the source of her good looks.

We suggest sticking with inexpensive skin creams, which work just as good as fancy ones.

We hope this helps you make a decision about RxGenesys – let us know your experience below!