Revivative from Actegy Health is a medical device that you put your feet on which claims to relieve pain, improve circulation, reduce tired feet and leg muscle weakness. They claim Revitative uses electrical muscle stimulation, which they state has been clinically proven to work, and will help you as you sit and rock your feet back and forth for just 20-30 minutes a day.

How Revivative Works

Revivative is a circular unit with a rounded bottom that is said to use electric muscle stimulation (EMS) to stimulate thousands of nerve endings on the foot. They state as a result of this, your foot muscles relax and create a pumping action, helping with the circulatory system in the leg. 

Reviative is said to have 99 levels of intensity so it’s powerful enough for everyone, but they caution certain people (like those with pacemakers, deep vein thrombosis, or are pregnant) should not use it

Actegy claims a recent clinical study showed Revivative increased circulation by over 50% but they don’t give any information about who conducted it or where. 

To use Revivative, they instruct you to sit down, put your feet on the foot pads, and plug in the device. Next, adjust the levels until you feel or see your muscles contracting; your feet may also rock back and forth. Then, they say to relax for 20-30 minutes as Revivative increases blood flow and reduces pain.

Revivative Cost:

$299.85 (listed as 3 payments of $99.95) plus $19.95 shipping for a total of $319.80.

Revivative comes with a 60-day money back guarantee (from order date) minus the shipping fee and what it costs you to send it back; it also comes with a 2-year warranty. 

Bottom Line: Is Revivative a Good Idea for Pain Relief?

Revivative was initially available in the UK and seems to have overwhelmingly positive reviews on Boots.com as well as Amazon UK.  

We’d just like to point out a few things. First, remember that it is on the expensive side and that the 60-day return starts from when you ordered Revivative, not when it arrives at your door.

And while devices like Revivative that use EMS have been cleared by the FDA, there is mixed evidence as to whether they actually work. A systematic review conducted at the University of Melbourne of its use in intensive care concluded the treatment is “promising” but there is “conflicting evidence” for its effectiveness. Similarly, Livestrong states that many EMS studies have shown little or no benefit for pain reduction when compared to a placebo. (As we noted in our article about the placebo effect, pain is one of several conditions that can be reduced by the mind alone.)

So are we saying that Revivative won’t work to help relieve pain? Clearly, there are many that have indeed found relief. We just wanted to point out that the science behind it is somewhat controversial. 

You may also want to read Hamstring Stretching Exercises for Sciatica Pain Relief, which they recommend doing while lying on your back.

Let us know your experience with Revivative