Dental Bright is an in-home tooth polisher the manufacturers claim will remove stains and make your mouth feel like you just visited the dentist. They state the device is similar to the one at the dentist office and that using it weekly will help you maintain a beautiful white smile.

Dental Bright is sold by Spark Innovators (who have an A+ BBB rating) and features an endorsement from a professional dentist, but does that mean this product will make your teeth whiter? Let’s take a closer peek.

The Dental Bright Pitch

Dental Bright uses Dr. Edward Romano, a cosmetic dentist from New Jersey as its spokesperson. Dr. Romano states Dental Bright helps “lift out” yellow and brings back a “youthful” appearance. He suggests you brush twice a day, floss once a day, and use Dental Bright to maintain your white smile.

How Dental Bright Works

Dental Bright is a handheld instrument that looks a lot like the polisher the dental hygienist uses at the very end of your visit. They state it is powered two AA batteries (not included) and comes with 5 polishing cups they say will last over 100 uses each. It also has a light which they promise helps you see what you are doing.

To use Dental Bright, put the polishing paste of choice on the end of the polishing cup (a “polishing whitener” is included with your order). Then they instruct you to polish each tooth; they claim this will get rid of plaque and make your teeth whiter. They insist people with sensitive teeth can use it and it will remove wine stains, tobacco stains, and even ones that have been on your teeth for years. They state you should use as a weekly maintenance tool to keep teeth bright.

The Dental Bright Cost

$25.00 for 2 Dental Brights, 10 polishing cups, and one tube of whitener (unknown size). This is sold to you as $10 for the first Dental Bright/cups plus $7.50 shipping but they automatically add another $7.50 fee for the second Dental Bright and “free” tube of whitener.

There is no return information about Dental Bright listed on the website. A customer service representative could not answer the question and promised to call us back.

Bottom Line: Is Dental Bright a Scam?

Dental Bright may indeed “polish” your teeth, but:

  • The type of toothbrush or “polisher” used is not important for whitening teeth. The sound and motion of the whirring may motivate you to clean better, but most dentists say a manual toothbrush will do the same job.
  • When it comes to whitening teeth, there are two main types of at-home polishers: whitening toothpastes and bleaching products containing peroxide. The bleaching products are usually applied in a strip or as a gel put in a mouth guard. There are pros and cons to each, but they should all have the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • There is no information about the ingredients of the whitening polish included with Dental Bright or if it has the ADA Seal.
  • We’re still waiting to hear if this product has any return policy; even if it does, you will still only get back $10 of your $25 purchase.
  • According to the American Dental Association: “The ADA recommends that if you choose to use a bleaching product, you should only do so after consultation with a dentist.”

What do you think? Did you buy Dental Bright and did it remove stains as promised or was it junk? Let us know below!